Up and Over

Grand National Whig banner.


THE TARS WILL MAN THEIR GALLANT SHIP.

Tune — “Washing Day

The Tars will man their gallant ships,
And fling the canvass free,
Again unfurl the “Bunting stripe”
And cheerily put to sea,
They’ll heave, and weigh, and stow, and pull,
And sing and hoist away,
They’ll hoist, and hoist, and hoist, and hoist,
And hoist in Henry Clay.

The Carmen long to see the loads
Of merchandise arrive,
For then the wharves, and streets and roads,
Will be a busy hive,
They’ll back, and pack, and pile and lash,
And drive and cart away;
And cart, and cart, and cart, and cart,
And carry in Henry Clay.

The press foretells a brighter day,
To cheer the Printer’s breast
They’ve turned the world the other way —
There’s Sunrise in the West!
They’ll set and impose, correct and revise,
And print, and publish away,
They’ll publish, and publish, and publish, and publish,
The name of Henry Clay.

The ladies, — bless the lovely band —
Our country’s joy and pride,
They go for Harry, hand in hand,
Maid, matron, belle, and bride,
To gain ‘Protection’ for themselves;
They’ll marry and marry away,
And tell their lovers, and husbands, and sons,
To vote for Henry Clay.

The rich, the poor, the bowed, the free,
Through all our noble land,
To bring the nation’s jubilee
Will lend a helping hand;
They’ll pull together all as one,
And shout and work away,
Together, together, together, together,
Huzza! for Henry Clay!


Notes:

A song in favor of that staple of the Whig platform,  protective tariffs.

A “bunting stripe” is a line of banners used for decoration.

A Carman is a carter.

Sunrise in the West is Henry Clay, from the West (Kentucky).

The Protection the ladies are looking for is protective tariffs, not what you’d you think (though if they have both lovers and husbands they probably need it).  One wonders what is meant by ‘marry’ here. The Whigs had pioneered including women in political campaigns in 1840, with amazingly good effects.


Tomorrow: Repartee

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This entry was posted in Huzzah!, politics and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Up and Over

  1. Reblogged this on Dr. Doyle's Editorial and Critique Services and commented:
    Another entry in Jim Macdonald’s continuing series of posts featuring songs from the 1844 Whig Songbook.

  2. Pingback: 1844 Whig Songbook Index | Madhouse Manor

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