I’d Thought I Was Done with Politics

After reprinting the Whig and Republican songbooks from 1844 and 1888 I thought I’d be done with this.  But hey, it’s time to stand up for truth.

Who knew that Teen Vogue would be a bastion of hard-hitting journalism?

The CIA officially determined that Russia intervened in our election, and President-elect Donald Trump dismissed the story as if it were a piece of fake news. “These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” his transition team wrote in a statement. “The election ended a long time ago in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history. It’s now time to move on and ‘Make America Great Again’.”

 

Of the statements in that release, we have three supposed facts and one opinion.

“These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,”

Not true: the intelligence community didn’t say that Saddam had weapons of mass destruction.  Bush, Cheney, and Rumsfeld did, and they were lying as they spoke.  I may get more into this later, to provide the proofs.

“The election ended a long time ago…”

Not true. One month and four days isn’t a “long time.”  And, until the Electoral College (designed to be our last bastion against demagogues)  votes, the election still isn’t over.

“…in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history.”

Not true.  Fully two-thirds of Electoral College victories, 1804-present, have been bigger.

Let’s fact-check that.  The presumed result in the Electoral College this time around (if the Electoral College doesn’t do their job) is Trump:Clinton 306:232.  How does that stack up as one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history?

Looking at recent history, 1960-2016 inclusive, there were fifteen elections.  Trump comes in 10 out of 15.  He came in ahead of Kennedy in 1960, Nixon in 1968, Carter in 1976, Bush in 2004, and Bush in 2000.

Source: http://www.270towin.com/historical-presidential-elections/

Year Winner Loser Third Party Candidates Winner’s Per Cent of the Electoral College
2016 306 232 0 Trump/ Clinton 59.8% (presumed)
2012 332 206 0 Obama/ Romney 61.7%
2008 365 173 0 Obama/ McCain 67.8%
2004 286 251 0 Bush/ Kerry 53.3%
2000 271 266 0 Bush/ Gore 50.5%
1996 379 159 0 Clinton/ Dole 70.4%
1992 370 168 0 Clinton/ Bush 68.8%
1988 426 111 0 Bush/ Dukakis 79.3%
1984 525 13 0 Reagan/ Mondale 97.6%
1980 489 49 0 Reagan/ Carter 90.9%
1976 297 270 0 Carter/ Ford 52.4%
1972 520 17 0 Nixon/ McGovern 96.8%
1968 301 191 46 Nixon/ Humphrey/ Wallace 55.9%
1964 486 52 0 Johnson/ Goldwater 90.3%
1960 303 219 15 Kennedy/ Nixon/ Byrd 56.4%

Alaska and Hawaii became states in 1959 and the size of the Electoral College changed then.  But if we look at the record from the century since 1912 (when New Mexico and Arizona joined the Union), we find Trump faring even worse.  Whether you look at raw numbers of electoral votes or percent of the Electoral College, he comes in 20th out of 27.  To the five that he beat between 1960 and 2016, Trump only comes in ahead of Truman in 1948 and Wilson in 1916.

Alaska and Hawaii admitted to the Union (1959)

1956 457 73 0 Eisenhower/ Stevenson 86.2%
1952 442 89 0 Eisenhower/ Stevenson 83.2%
1948 303 189 39 Truman/ Dewey/ Thurmond 57.1%
1944 432 99 0 Roosevelt/ Dewey 81.4%
1940 449 82 0 Roosevelt/ Wilkie 84.6%
1936 532 8 0 Roosevelt/ Landon 98.5%
1932 472 59 0 Roosevelt/ Hoover 88.9%
1928 444 87 0 Hoover/ Smith 83.6%
1924 382 116 13 Coolidge/ Davis/ LaFollette 74.8%
1920 404 127 0 Harding/ Cox 76.1%
1916 277 254 0 Wilson/ Hughes 52.2%
1912 425 88 8 Wilson/ Roosevelt/ Taft 81.6%

Arizona and New Mexico admitted to the Union (1912)

20th out of 27.  Our boy Trump is firmly ensconced in the bottom third over the last century.

Between 1804 and 1908 we have another twenty-seven elections.  I’m switching over to the winner’s percentage of the Electoral College here, because the size of the EC kept changing as territories became states and states changed in population.  How’s Trump compare?

Woo! looking only at those 104 years he’s eleventh out of twenty-seven.  He’s rocked his way up to having  only 60% of the Electoral College victories being greater than his.

When we look at  the elections between 1804 and 1908 Trump with his 59.8% only came in ahead of:

Year Candidates Winner’s per cent in the EC
1888 Harrison/ Cleveland 59.6%
1860 Lincoln/ Breckinridge/ Bell/ Douglas 59.4%
1812 Madison/ George Clinton 59.0%
1856 Buchanan/ Fremont/ Fillmore 58.8%
1880 Garfield/ Hancock 58.0%
1836 Van Buren/ Harrison/ White/ Webster/ Mangum 57.8%
1848 Taylor/ Cass 56.2%
1884 Cleveland/ Blaine 54.6%
1876 Hayes/ Tilden 50.1%
1824 Jackson/ Adams/ Crawford/ Clay 37.9%

(Note: The 1824 election had no winner in the Electoral College and went to the House under the 12th Amendment where Adams prevailed.)

From 1789 to 1800 inclusive, the electoral process was entirely different.  The candidate winning the most votes in the Electoral College became president, while the person with the second-most votes became vice-president.  Washington is considered to have been elected unanimously for both of his terms (1789 and 1792).  1796, the first contested election, gave us a president and vice-president from different parties (Adams, a Federalist, and Jefferson, a Democratic-Republican).   The election of 1800, which left Jefferson and Burr tied in the Electoral College (Jefferson became President, Burr his Vice-President) showed that the system was unworkable, leading to the modern ticket/running-mate system.  Those four eighteenth century elections can’t be compared in any meaningful way with elections in the 19th, 20th, or 21st centuries.

trump_graph

CONCLUSION:  When the Republicans call Mr. Trump’s victory “one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history” they are lying.

 

Why lie about something so trivial, and so easily checked?

Election year Winner Loser Third Party   Candidates  Per Cent
1820 231 1 0 Monroe/ Adams 99.6
1936 532 8 0 Roosevelt/ Landon 98.5
1984 525 13 0 Reagan/ Mondale 97.6
1972 520 17 0 Nixon/ McGovern 96.8
1804 162 14 0 Jefferson/ Pinckney 92.0
1864 212 21 0 Lincoln/ McClellan 91.0
1980 489 49 0 Reagan/ Carter 90.9
1964 486 52 0 Johnson/ Goldwater 90.3
1932 472 59 0 Roosevelt/ Hoover 88.9
1956 457 73 0 Eisenhower/ Stevenson 86.2
1852 254 42 0 Pierce/ Scott 85.8
1940 449 82 0 Roosevelt/ Wilkie 84.6
1816 183 34 0 Monroe/ King 84.3
1928 444 87 0 Hoover/ Smith 83.6
1952 442 89 0 Eisenhower/  Stevenson 83.2
1872 286 42 21 Grant/ Hendricks/ Brown/ Jenkins/ Davis 81.9
1912 425 88 8 Wilson/ Roosevelt/ Taft 81.6
1944 432 99 0 Roosevelt/ Dewey 81.4
1840 234 60 0 Harrison/ Van Buren 79.6
1988 426 111 0 Bush/ Dukakis 79.3
1832 219 49 18 Jackson/ Clay/ Floyd/ Wirt 76.6
1920 404 127 0 Harding/ Cox 76.1
1924 382 116 13 Coolidge/ Davis/ LaFollette 74.8
1868 214 80 0 Grant/ Seymour 72.8
1904 336 140 0 Roosevelt/ Parker 70.6
1996 379 159 0 Clinton/ Dole 70.4
1808 122 47 6 Madison/ Pinckney/ Clinton 69.7
1992 370 168 0 Clinton/ Bush 68.8
1828 178 83 0 Jackson/ Adams 68.2
2008 365 173 0 Obama/ McCain 67.8
1908 321 162 0 Taft/ Bryan 66.5
1900 292 155 0 McKinley/ Bryan 65.3
1892 277 145 22 Cleveland/ Harrison/ Weaver 62.4
1844 170 105 0 Polk/ Clay 61.8
2012 332 206 0 Obama/ Romney 61.7
1896 271 176 0 McKinley/ Bryan 60.6
2016 306 206 0 Trump/ Clinton 59.8
1888 233 158 0 Harrison/ Cleveland 59.6
1860 180 72 51 Lincoln/ Breckinridge/ Bell/ Douglas 59.4
1812 128 89 0 Madison/ Clinton 59.0
1856 174 114 8 Buchanan/ Fremont/ Fillmore 58.8
1880 214 155 0 Garfield/ Hancock 58.0
1836 170 73 51 Van Buren/ Harrison/ White/ Webster/ Mangum 57.8
1948 303 189 39 Truman/ Dewey/ Thurmond 57.1
1960 303 219 15 Kennedy/ Nixon/ Byrd 56.4
1848 163 127 0 Taylor/Cass 56.2
1968 301 191 46 Nixon/ Humphrey/ Wallace 55.9
1884 219 182 0 Cleveland/ Blaine 54.6
2004 286 251 0 Bush/ Kerry 53.3
1976 297 270 0 Carter/ Ford 52.4
1916 277 254 0 Wilson/ Hughes 52.2
2000 271 266 0 Bush/ Gore 50.5
1876 185 184 0 Hayes/ Tilden 50.1
1824 99 84 78 Jackson/ Adams/ Crawford/ Clay 37.9
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2 Responses to I’d Thought I Was Done with Politics

  1. Who knew that Teen Vogue would be a bastion of hard-hitting journalism?

    Say that Teen Vogue‘s readers are mainly young women between 13 and 21. Most of them are going to be of voting age by the next presidential election, and some of them are going to be of voting age even earlier, by the time the mid-terms roll around. And a whole lot of them aren’t very happy right now.

  2. Pingback: I Like Reality… | Madhouse Manor

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